2003

   So Much for Transparency (Scandal-plagued Putnam Investments stops reporting detailed mutual fund flows to AMG Data Services) (Informer, with co-author, Forbes, December 22, 2003, p. 50.

   But in Type Not Quite as Prominent (Glowing ads by Donald M. Fishback Jr. of Lexington KY for his Options & Derivatives Support trading system don’t mention he settled fraud charges brought by the U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission in 2001 and surrendered registrations) (Informer), Forbes, December 22, 2003, p. 50.

   Us? Negative? (Thomas Kinkade Foundation Charitable Trust cites “negative light” coverage by Forbes to support bid for court order against the IRS (Informer, with co-author), Forbes, December 22, 2003, p. 50

   Maybe Google Should Google Itself (Google search engine accepts ads for known frauds but bars ads by scam-exposing Quatloos web site) (Informer, with co-author), Forbes, December 22, 2003, p. 50.

   She Should Have Moved to Jersey (Judge rules bankrupt bond seller Christine Carter Lynch is liable for $600,000 of unpaid taxes because of her opulent lifestyle) (Informer, with co-author), Forbes, December 22, 2003, p. 50.

   What Did the Other 98% See (Pepperdine University’s Graziadio School of Business and Management says lectures on white-collar crime prompt 2% of students with side jobs to quit) (Informer, with co-author), Forbes, December 22, 2003, p. 50.

   Taxing Conclusions (Table lists IRS actions against dubious income-tax reduction schemes) (Informer), Forbes, December 22, 2003, p. 50.

   Goose Eggs Across the Board (Texas Supreme Court rules unanimously for Forbes Inc. and William P. Barrett, ending 11-year-old defamation litigation filed by Houston businessman David Eller, Granada Biosciences and Granada Foods.), Web exclusive, December 19, 2003.

   Genuinely Needs (Annual evaluation of 200 major nonprofits, with gold stars given to 10), Forbes, December 8, 2003, p. 246.

   Leverage Takes Time (Robb Report Worth f/k/a Worth Magazine said it was “leveraging” Worth’s “financial acumen” but hired only one of 49 editorial staffers) (Informer), Forbes, December 8, 2003, p. 52.    

   Rising Costs (Federal Medicare system spends $600,000 to rent a blimp) (Informer, with co-author), Forbes, December 8, 2003, p. 52.

   Crackdown at the Mutual Fund Casbah  (SEC mutual fund reforms probably will raise costs to investors), Forbes.com, December 3, 2003.

   Lofty Professions or Mere Sales Job? (KPMG agreed to pay Sidley Austin Brown & Wood a fee for selling questionable tax shelters) (Informer, with co-author), Forbes, November 24, 2003, p. 46.

   It Does Take One to Know One  (To help in enforcement, IRS hires John C. Klotsche, ex-Baker & McKenzie chair on whose watch the firm pioneered corporate inversions), (Informer, with co-author), Forbes, November 24, 2003, p. 46.

   What’s the Next Ad Going to Say?  (After running ads overstating a tax cut, Gov. Bill Richardson of New Mexico endorses sharp tax increases) (Informer), Forbes, November 24, 2003, p. 46.    

   Certainly a Debatable Proposition (Federal study says executive pay raises for government workers might be unneeded) (Informer, with co-author), Forbes, November 24, 2003, p. 46.

   Quantifying the Gray Davis Surcharge (Table shows premium that U-Haul gets for rental trucks leaving California) (Informer, with co-author), Forbes, November 24, 2003, p. 46

   Think Tank or Mountebank? (Airlie Foundation loses bid for tax exemption) (Informer, with co-author), Forbes, November 10, 2003, p. 48.

   How Many Weren’t Counted in 2000? (U.S. Census Bureau issues press release on hurricane) (Informer, with co-author), Forbes, November 10, 2003, p. 48.

   It’s a Naďve Domestic Toilet Without Any Breeding, But I Think You’ll Be Amused by Its Presumption  (Kohler Co. sues Jacuzzi Brands for trademark infringement) (Informer, with co-author), Forbes, October 27, 2003, p. 48.   

   Still in the Running (New Mexico Taxation and Revenue Department hasn’t received an unqualified auditors opinion in seven years) (Informer), Forbes, October 27, 2003, p. 48.

   Time is Money, Y’All  (Generation-skipping trusts benefiting heirs of Home Interiors and Gifts founder Mary C. Crowley sue for a $14.2 million refund) (Informer, with co-author), Forbes, October 27, 2003, p. 48.

   So Move to New Hampshire (Jeremy M. Jacobs Sr. loses tax lawsuit in Massachusetts) (Informer, with co-author), Forbes, October 13, 2003, p. 42.

   Charity Begins at Home (Report on nonprofits calls for $8,000 cap on fees to trustees) (Informer, with co-author), Forbes, October 13, 2003, p. 42.    

   Did Zach Have an Intern? (SafeSearch function of Google deletes material on Zachary Taylor from whitehouse.gov) (Informer, with co-author), Forbes, October 13, 2003, p. 42.

   New Name: “Painter of Tax-Exempts” (IRS withdraws objection to nonprofit established by “painter of light” Thomas Kinkade) (Informer, with co-author), Forbes, October 13, 2003, p.42.

   Competitive Edge From Dreams (Table lists financial services firms with generic words registered as trademarks) (Informer), Forbes, October 13, 2003, p. 42.

   This Land is My Land (Nation’s 10 largest family landowners listed, led by R.E. (Ted) Turner and Irving family (with co-author), Forbes, October 6, 2003, p. 50.

   Unrealized Riches (IRS list of 400 top taxpayers, compared with Forbes 400 list, shows importance of unrealized gains), Forbes, October 6, 2003, p. 60.

   Not the Master of His Own Domain (Panel rules Estee Lauder, co-owned by Ronald Lauder, has no right to Web domains ronaldlauder.com and ronaldlauder.org) (Informer), Forbes, October 16, 2003, p. 40.

   Kohler Family Agrees: A Toilet is Truly a Throne (Kohler family says high estate valuation was due to “glamour factor” that should be ignored) (Informer, with co-author), Forbes, October 6, 2003, p. 40.

   Gatescrasher (Nonprofits are warned about a scam involving the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation) (Informer, with co-author), Forbes, October 6, 2003, p. 40.

   Old Money, New Problems (Table lists asset declines in foundations founded by early 20th century fortunes) (Informer), Forbes, October 6, 2003, p. 40.

   So Much for Diversification  (Hilbert Foundation of ex-Conseco boss Stephen Hilbert loses 99% of value) (Informer, with co-author), Forbes, September 29, 2003, p. 38.

   Take 2 Pills, Call Me in the Cook Islands (National Medical Foundation for Asset Protection says doctors can get continuing medical education credit for taking course on how to frustrate patient lawsuits) (Informer, with co-author), Forbes, September 29, 2003, p. 38.

   Like Father, Like Son?  (John T. Dorrance IV gives up U.S. citizenship) (Informer, with co-author), Forbes, September 29, 2003, p. 38.

   A Shill by Any Other Name? (George Chang says he was a “public relations player” at Hollywood park Casino) (Informer, with co-author), Forbes, September 29, 2003, p. 38.

   But Pepsixxx Might Have a Little More Fizz (Table lists domain-name disputes often involving deliberate misspellings) (Informer), Forbes, September 29, 2003, p. 38.

   Fighting Insurance Fraud (Public opinion may be standing in the way of fighting insurance fraud), Forbes.com, September 22, 2003

   Why Insurance Rates Are High (Saga of lawyer and convicted insurance scammer Rex K. DeGeorge), Forbes, September 15, 2003, p. 66.

   Should Be on Fiction List (Federal magistrate Carl Horn III writes book on how lawyers can find a higher calling) (Informer, with co-author), Forbes, September 15, 2003, p. 36.

   But at Least the Advice Comes Free (Study says stock picks posted on Internet discussion groups are little different from those made by the pros) (Informer), Forbes, September 15, 2003, p. 36.

   Say “Cheese” (2600 The Hacker Quarterly publishes article on how to alter manufacturer coupon for Philadelphia Cream Cheese) (Informer), Forbes, September 15, 2003, p. 36.

   Stick With Land (Arthur Temple Jr. seeks $5.8 million gift tax refund) (Informer, with co-author), Forbes, September 1, 2003, p. 38

   Win Some, Lose Some  (Ronald Burkle still has problems with $25 million investment in Simon Worldworld) (Informer), Forbes, September 1, 2003, p. 38.

   So Much for Diversity  (Academic study says better-looking professors receive more favorable classroom evaluations from students) (Informer, with co-author), Forbes, September 1, 2003, p. 38.

   Watch What You Wish For (Public Company Accounting Oversight Board has drawn nickname Peekaboo, reminiscent of way inept Federal Savings & Loan Insurance Corp. drew derisive nickname of Fizzlick (Informer, with co-author), Forbes, September 1, 2003, p, 38.

   Post Office Should Gloat  (Board of Contract Appeals rules Tiger Natural Gas missed deadline because it used FedEx instead of regular mail) (Informer, with co-author), Forbes, September 1, 2003, p. 38.

   Better Late Than Never (General Accounting Office keeps secret 283 audits dating back to 1959 (Informer), Forbes, September 1, 2003, p. 38.

   Really?  (Block All Spam promotes itself with spam), (Informer, with co-author), Forbes, September 1, 2003, p. 38.

   R shares, Competitive—But for Whom (John Hancock becomes latest mutual fund family to start R share class, which raises fees), Forbes.com, August 13, 2003.    

   It’s Hard to Belize (Table lists shady dealings in Belize) (Informer, with co-author), Forbes, August 11, 2003, p. 50.

   IRS Versus Daily Bread (New IRS restaurant industry audit manual urges close look at tax deduction for food donations to charity) (Informer, with co-author), Forbes, August 11, 2003, p. 50.    

   Child Soldiers? (Citizens Against Government Waste highlights $8.7 million for military “child development center”) (Informer), Forbes, August 11, 2003, p. 50.

   They May Get an Expensive Lesson (IRS says Sharon Karmazin, ex-wife of Viacom President Mel Karmazin, wrongly claimed a 44% discount in an estate-planning deal) (Informer, with co-author), Forbes, August 11, 2003, p. 50.

   Lawyers Have Bounds? (Court says ex-lawyers for failed carmaker John Z. DeLorean can sue his other lawyers) (Informer, with co-author), Forbes, August 11, 2003, p. 50.

   Cru Rio Grande (Gruet Winery prospers after family members leave France for New Mexico), Forbes, August 11, 2003, p. 96.

   Le Vin a la Rio Grande (Gruet Winery prospers after family members leave France for New Mexico), Forbes Global, July 21, 2003, p. 62.

   Gone But Definitely Not Forgotten (Dart Container Corp., owned by expatriates Kenneth Dart and Robert Dart, are back in U.S. Tax Court) (Informer, with co-author), Forbes, July 21, 2003, p. 52.    

   Guess With One, Loyal Readers? (IRS starts new data series focusing, for some reason, on exactly the 400 wealthiest individuals) (Informer, with co-author), Forbes, July 21, 2003, p. 52.

   Why Big Business Needs Big Government More Than It Admits (Table lists 16 IT/telecom vendors that received $22 billion from the U.S. government, 1.2% of the federal budget (Informer, with co-author), Forbes, July 21, 2003, p. 52.

   Back to the Futures  (Single-stock futures is new alternative to options or shorting), Forbes.com, July 9, 2003.       

   You Paid 88% of This Debt (Cordoba Corp., Los Angeles firm run by politically connected George Pla, settled $2.1 million owed the IRS for $251,000.) (Informer, with co-author), Forbes. July 7, 2003, p. 50.

   So Much for Careful Resarch (H Team Capital LLC of New York says documents about its new mutual fund can be found online but doesn’t provide enough data to search) (Informer), Forbes, July 7, 2003, p. 50.

   Another Way to Gamble in Nevada (Table shows Nevada leads the 50 states in Internet-based fraud) (Informer, with co-author), Forbes, July 7, 2003, p. 50.

   Mere Nicks in a Big Cash Flow (The IRS says Anschutz Co., owned by Denver billionaire Philip Anschutz, owes $14.8 million more in taxes) (Informer, with co-author), Forbes, June 23, 2003, p. 60.    

   New Web Site: Avoidtaxes.com (Los Angeles criminal defense lawyer Barry Bernstein, who has website avoidjail.com, settled $1 million of tax liabilities for less than 6 cents on the dollar (Informer, with co-author), Forbes, June 23, 2003, p. 60.

   So Much Money, So Many Problems—NOT!  (Table lists email examples of Nigeria-style “Help us get the money out of the country” scams from across Africa (Informer, with co-author), Forbes, June 23, 2003, p. 60.

   The Auditing Industry Plays Peekaboo (Public Company Accounting Oversight Board may not help investors), Forbes.com, June 12, 2003.

   Foul Situation? (Harrison Securities, Port Washington, N.Y., brags in a press release about beating Goldman Sachs in sports but doesn’t mention regulatory baggage) (Informer), Forbes, June 9, 2003, p. 62.

   No Stranger to the Regulators, Either (Los Angeles broker Bryant R. Riley, B. Riley & Co., offers himself for comment on stock scandals but has been censured and fined himself) (Informer), Forbes, June 9, 2003. P. 62.

   A Mug Bearing Mugs (Antifraud Web site Quatloos offers for $25 coffee mugs bearing photos of 15 infamous tax protestors) (Informer, with co-author), Forbes, June 9, 2003, p. 62.

   The ABA Should Hire a Lawyer (Disbarred lawyer, felon and tax protestor William Drexler registers the American Bar Association name in Arizona) (Informer, with co-author), Forbes, May 26, 2003, p.64.

   But Others Might Have an Opinion (Financial Analysts Journal study says stocks most favored by analysts returned –14% in 2000 and 2001 while least favored earned 26.9% (Informer), Forbes, May 26, 2003, p. 64.

   Untouchable? Not if Hoover could help it (FBI director J. Edgar Hoover orchestrated a secret campaign against actor Robert Stack and his television show The Untouchables), Forbes.com, May 15, 2003.

   A Taxing Proposal for Expat Americans? (Proposal to end $80,000 income exclusion for Americans working abroad may have less impact than feared), Forbes.com, May 13, 2003.

   Underground Atlanta (Federal judge rules that prominent AIDS researcher and Emory University professor Raymond F. Schinazi had “fraudulent intent” in leaving $158,000 of patent royalties off his tax return) (Informer, with co-author), Forbes, May 12, 2003, p. 70.

   $30 Million Just Wouldn’t Do It (Goldman Sachs Group shareholders approve plan that would allow 29 executive to get annual bonuses of up to 1% of operating income—each, up to $35 million cap (Informer, with co-author), Forbes, May 12, 2003, p. 70.

   Behind Those “Always Low Prices”? (A property tax consulting firm in Dallas is suing Wal-Mart Stores claiming non payment for tax reduction advice) (Informer, with co-author), Forbes, May 12, 2003, p. 70.

   Frankly, We Could Have Filled This Entire Page (Table lists financial advisors recently sentenced to prison, including one on death row) (Informer), Forbes, May 12, 2003, p. 70. 

   Costa Rica: Welcome to the New Nigeria  (Table lists recent fraud involving Costa Rica) (Informer), Forbes, April 28, 2003, p. 60.    

   The Battle for Your Money (Financial planners continue fight over meaning of phrase “fee-only), Forbes.com, April 11, 2003.

   History is Cheap  (House at 209 High Street N.E, Albuquerque, NM, where Rosenberg atomic bomb spy secrets changed hands in 1945, is for sale at $259,900) (Informer), Forbes, April 14, 2003, p. 70.

   My Fair Taxes (Federal income taxes are finally settled for Broadway luminary Alan Jay Lerner, who died in 1986) (Informer, with co-author), Forbes, March 31, 2003, p. 51.

   They Would Spoil the Party (A Raymond James Financial Services office sends invitations to professionals but discourages them from attending) (Informer, with co-author), Forbes, March 31, 2003, p. 60.

   In Maryland, Fluff Over Substance (Study says stocks touted on old Wall Street Week with Louis Rukeyser beat benchmarks over two years) (Informer), Forbes, March 31, 2003, p. 60

   Our Finest Minds at Work (Table lists examples of patent granted to most productive universities) (Informer, with co-author), Forbes, March 31, 2003, p. 60.

   It’s All in the Marketing (New Mexico governor Bill Richardson cuts state income taxes by 27.4%, then runs ad saying cut is 40%) (Informer), Forbes, March 17, 2003, p. 60.

   Wait Until the IRS Gets Done (Mexican singer Juan Gabriel fights IRS demand he owes $5.4 million for underreporting $13.9 million in income (Informer, with co-author), Forbes, March 17, 2003, p. 60.

   Boston Whine and Cheese Party (Table lists ongoing economic boycotts) (Informer, with co-author), Forbes, March 17, 2003, p. 60.

   The Bloom is Off the Rose (529 college savings plans are not working out, but there are alternatives), Forbes.com, March 14, 2003.

   For Use at Your Next Cocktail Party (Flush Media, which sells bathroom advertising, releases statistics on restroom usage) (Informer), Forbes, March 3, 2003, p. 52.   

   Liesel’s Fallout (Pritzker Foundation sold assets to family-controlled businesses but told regulators there were no such transactions) (co-author), Forbes, March 3, 2003, p. 48.

   Private Foundations on the Cheap ($10,000 can establish what amounts to your own private foundation), Forbes.com, February 19, 2003.

   Mind, Body—and Money (New Age guru Deepak Chopra is sued by ex-agent Literary and Creative Artists Inc. for more than $1 million) (Informer, with co-author), Forbes, February 17, 2003, p. 60.

   A Form for Every Occasion  (U.S. Treasury Department Bureau of the Public Debt has official form for purchasers “involved in a chain letter scheme”) (Informer, with co-author), Forbes, February 17, 2003, p. 60.

   A Positive Fuel Charge (Marriott International boosts earnings by buying money-losing synthetic fuel plans, which earn tax credits) (Informer, with co-author), Forbes, February 3, 2003, p. 50.

   Eminent Domain in Bulk (Costco Wholesale bars shareholder vote on use of eminent domain) (Informer), Forbes, February 3, 2003, p. 50.

   Some People Just Have Too Much Time  (Librarians take seriously a tongue-in-cheek Web poll by Mattel about careers for future Barbie doll models) (Informer), Forbes, February 3, 2003.

   Loving It in Loving County, Texas (Table lists counties with highest per-capita income) (Informer), Forbes, February 3, 2003, p. 50.

   Unlocking the Gates Foundation  (Gates Foundation avoids big portfolio losses by sticking to fixed income), Forbes.com, January 30, 2003.   

   Big Beneficiaries: Lawyers ($200 million estate of philanthropist Henry J. Leir, who died in 1998, remains stuck in litigation and undistributed to intended charities) (Informer, with co-author), Forbes, January 20, 2003, p. 48.

   Deposit Insurance? What’s That? (Weiss Ratings pitches its bank-evaluation service to the insurance industry it has beaten up on for years) (Informer, with co-author), Forbes, January 20, 2002, p. 48.

   Forget Sports--These Are the College Results That Matter (Table lists bond-rating changes of such colleges as Emory University, University of Evansville, Gettysburg College and Morehouse College) (Informer),  Forbes, January 20, 2003, p. 48.

   A Big Little Loss  (Clothing designer Carole Little challenges federal tax bill) (Informer, with co-author), Forbes, January 6, 2003, p. 93.

   Heart Attack (American Heart Association attacks financing of study supporting Atkins diet but doesn’t mention its own revenues from competing diet and cook books) (Informer), Forbes, January 6, 2003, p. 93.

   The Going Rate for Campus Immortality (Table lists costs of getting things named for one’s family on a campus) (Informer), Forbes, January 6, 2003, p. 93.

2002

   Who’s Watching State Tax Agencies?  (Screw-ups abound among the tax departments of the 50 states), Forbes.com, December 27, 2002.

   Just Wondering Who Taught Them This Stuff (Table lists numerous Harvard Business School graduates convicted of crimes) (Informer), Forbes, December 23, 2002, p. 80.

   Painter of Chutzpah (Artist Thomas Kinkade sues Internal Revenue Service after it refused to give his nonprofit tax-exempt status) (Informer, with co-author), Forbes, December 23, 2002, p. 80.

   Good Works (Table evaluates 200 nonprofits for financial efficiencies) (co-author), Forbes, December 9, 2002, p. 186.

   Probably Not Mentioned in Chamber of Commerce Promotional Literature (Table lists numerous cases involving suspected fraud and financial finagling in Spokane, Wash.) (Informer), Forbes, December 9, 2002, p. 68.    

   Sounds Like Normal TV (Estate lawyers are fuming over e-mail pitches from producer Mike Fleiss of The Wall) (Informer, with co-author), Forbes, December 9, 2002, p. 68.

   Some Games May Have No Winners (Mr. Bigshot, a new board game by Courtney Tudor, allows investors to make actual picks all over again) (Informer), Forbes, December 9, 2002, p. 68.

   But It’s Not Too Hard to Figure Out Why (BackBerry maker Research in Motion promotes one media account calling Bill Gates a user, but ignores another quoting him as saying he has never used one) (Informer), Forbes, November 25, 2002, p. 66.

   Not Exactly Members of the United Nations (Table lists jurisdictions without legitimacy:  Great United Kiseean Kingdom, Kingdom of Enenkio, Kingdom of Kerguelon, Kingdom of Landreth, Dominion of Melchizedek, Principality of New Utopia and Wessex Principality) (Informer), Forbes, November 25, 2002, p. 66.

   Unlike the Disclosure Rules for Tyco (Manhattan District Attorney Robert M. Morgenthau is not required to disclose personal finances) (Informer), Forbes, October 28, 2002, p. 109.

   Clients Win—But Only After they Lose (John Hancock life insurance policyholders settling a class-action lawsuit would get money only if they die quick) (Informer), Forbes, October 28, 2002, p. 109.      

   Hey, Mortgages Are Serious Stuff (Federal authorities take out newspaper ad looking for convicted swindler John Ruffo, who stiffed big banks for $350 million) (Informer), Forbes, October 14, 2002. p. 58.

   Next, a Levy on Sunlight (Winona, Minn., plans to levy fees on rain) (Informer), Forbes, October 14, 2002, p. 58.

   Gee, Your Honor, I Thought They Were My Clients (Table lists lawyers hit with sanctions for frivolous pleadings) (Informer, with co-author), Forbes, October 14, 2002, p. 58.

   The March of the 400 (Colorful history of the Forbes 400 list, 20 years old this year), Forbes, September 30, 2002, p. 80.

   Oh, I Was Just Trying to Stop the Spread of West Nile Virus (Table lists prominent individuals accused of wetlands violations) (Informer, with co-author), Forbes, September 30, 2002, p. 58.

   But Isn’t it Smarter to InvesBottom? (Goldman Sachs promotes its InvesTop Index of bonds) (Informer), Forbes, September 30, 2002, p. 58.  

   Blame Canada  (Canada accounts for 70% of telemarketing fraud in the U.S.) (Informer), Forbes, September 30, 2002, p. 58.

   Officers of the Court (Table lists 10 lawyers convicted of or sentenced to felonies over a recent 60-day period) (Informer), Forbes, September 16, 2002, p. 54.

   No Boss, That Wasn’t a Massage Parlor (Attendees to World Economic Forum got bills listing meals as “health products”) (Informer), Forbes, September 16, 2002, p. 54.

   Now Why Does Apr. 15 Ring a Bell? (Prominent agent Arthur Kaminsky filed his 1999 federal tax return in 2002) (Informer, with co-author), Forbes, September 16, 2002, p. 54.

   Life, Liberty and the Pursuits of Moguls (Federal Government to subsidize commercial air travel on Horizon Air to the post ski resort of Sun Valley, Idaho) (Informer), Forbes, September 2, 2002, p. 56.    

   Timing is Everything (After inquiries by Forbes, V-Day Foundation, playwright Eve Ensler’s charity, finally gets money from its efforts to sell tickets to Ensler’s play, Necessary Targets) (Informer), Forbes, September 2, 2002, p. 56.

   Let Fred Smith Fly All He Wants (Table shows stock price declined for 11 of 12 corporate executive whose companies paid them big sums for personal travel) (Informer), Forbes, August 12, 2002, p. 56.

   Definitely Not a Good Thing  (Like the current insider-trading scandal, Martha Stewart couldn’t produce exculpatory documents in a 2000 state income tax case) (Informer, with co-author), Forbes, July 22, 2002, p. 50.

   Where’s the Chief Executive’s Yacht? (Sources say ex-Tyco boss Dennis Kozlowski has stopped work on a $15 million, 150-foot-long aluminum sailing boat) (Informer, with co-author), Forbes, July 22, 2002, p. 50.

   Big Time Back Scratching (Shareholder activist Robert A.G. Monks has no comment about fallen Tyco International head Dennis Kozlowski, who helped fund a chair in Monks’ name at Cambridge University) (Informer), Forbes, July 8, 2002, p. 60.

   His Web Site: Unionsarelosers.com (Union attacks leveraged buyout artist Holcombe T Green Jr. by creating website http://www.holcombegreenhouseofcards.org) (Informer, with co-author), Forbes, July 8, 2002, p. 60.

   The Going Rate for Quid Pro Quo  (Table lists payoff ratio from bribery cases around the country) (Informer), Forbes, July 8, 2002, p. 60.

   Ohio State No Match for Grinnell (Table lists major college endowments with biggest one-year changes in value) (Informer), Forbes, June 10, 2002, p. 58.

   Advice You Can Trust  (Finding a financial adviser) (co-authors), Forbes, June 10, 2002, p. 168.

   A Plan to Get a Planner  (Table evaluates 12 sources of financial planning advice) (co-author), Forbes, June 10, 2002, p. 186.

   Compared to What?  (How to use a benchmark to evaluate portfolio performance), Forbes, June 10, 2002, p. 180.   

   Plenty of Pain, But No Gain (Table lists 16 mutual fund managers who collectively have lost $270 billion over two years) (Informer), Forbes, May 13, 2002, p. 50.

   What About Silicon Glut?  (Many areas pushing economic development use a variation on the name Silicon Valley) (Informer), Forbes, May 13, 2002, p. 50.

   Whose Conduct Was Gross? (Ex-broker Robert W. Taylor awarded $75,000 from Vanguard Group on defamation claim (Informer), Forbes, April 29, 2002, p. 46.    

   Accounting for Questionable Conduct  (Table lists accountants besides Arthur Andersen LLP charged with crimes) (Informer), Forbes, April 15, 2002, p. 50.

   Who’s Legitimate?  (Shares of Hartmarx trade for less than half the price of takeover offer it opposed) (Informer), Forbes, April 15, 2002, p. 50.

   The Biggest Scandal is What’s Legal  (Harvard Business School Publishing Corp. is a tax-exempt nonprofit but still sent $18 million, on revenues of $78 million, to owner Harvard University) (Informer), Forbes, April 15, 2002, p. 50.

   Charitable Largess—But for Whom? (Table lists officials of nonprofits charged with crimes) (Informer), Forbes, April 1, 2002, p. 46

   Too Much Fun in the Sun (Arbitration panel says Muriel Siebert & Co. “significantly failed” to supervise its Florida operations) (Informer), Forbes, March 18, 2002, p. 52.    

   Playing at the Wrong Court (The IRS says Boston Celtics player Eric Williams filed a late tax return, took improper deductions and didn’t include $139,000 of income) (Informer, with co-author), Forbes, March 18, 2002, p. 52.

   Do Shredders Work on Web? (McKinsey & Co. web sites are among few remaining sources of public praise for Enron Corp.) (Informer, with co-author), Forbes, March 4, 2002, p. 48.

   Record Year for Whom?  (National Association of Securities Dealers says arbitrators awarded investors $97 million in 2001, but can’t say how much was actually paid) (Informer), Forbes, March 4, 2002, p. 48.

   After all, the F in CFO Does Stand for Financial (Table lists high-paid chief financial officers) (Informer, with co-author), Forbes, March 4, 2002, p. 48.

   Does CFO Sometimes Mean “Chief Fraud Officer”? (Table lists chief financial officers who have faced criminal charges, and even gone to prison, for corporate-fraud-related charges) (Informer), Forbes, February 18, 2002, p. 48.

   Sudden Money for Whom? (Palm Beach Gardens, Florida, financial planner Susan Bradley, who heads the Sudden Money Institute, carries some baggage) (Informer), Forbes, February 18, 2002, p. 48.

   Bracing for Another E-Mail Onslaught  (National Scientific Corp. finally booked some revenue but still lost money) (Informer), Forbes, February 18, 2002, p. 48. 

   Kalamazoo Now Stands Among the Giants (Table lists 10 largest afternoon newspapers) (Informer), Forbes, February 4, 2002, p. 42.

   No Trouble Getting This Drift (Alan Greenspan criticizes Enron Corp. and head Kenneth Lay after getting Enron Prize) (Informer), Forbes, February 4, 2002, p. 42.    

   A Policy of Sticky Fingers (Table lists insurance agents with convictions) (Informer), Forbes, January 21, 2002, p. 42

   Attention Kmart Forum Shoppers (New Mexico court rebuffs tax ploy by Kmart) (Informer, with co-author), Forbes, January 21, 2002, p. 42.

   First Down, $1.8 Million to Go (New York Giants fights federal tax claims for $1.8 million) (Informer, with co-author) Forbes, January 7, 2002, p. 46.

 

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